Author's Guidelines

A. Requirements for article topics/themes

1. Articles submitted to the Journal of Innovation in Business and Economics (JIBE) must be original works that have not been published elsewhere.

2. The article must be relevant to the field of economics or business.

3. The journal focuses on exploring emerging and state-of-the-art innovations in business, economics, and management made possible by advances in information, communication, and technology.

B.  Systematics of writing

Your paper can be as long as you want it to be. However, JIBE only accepts papers that are no longer than 8,000 words.

The requirements for new and revised manuscripts are now separated. You have the option of submitting your paper as a single Word or PDF file for refereeing. You will be asked to put your paper in a 'proper format' for acceptance and give the things required to publish your article only when it is in the revision stage.

This list can be used to double-check your contribution before sending it to the journal for review. Ensure that the following items are present:

One author has been designated as the corresponding author with contact details:
• E-mail address
• Authors' institutional

All necessary files have been uploaded:
Manuscript:
• Include keywords
• All figures (include relevant captions)
• All tables (including titles, description, footnotes)
• Ensure all figure and table citations in the text match the files provided
• Indicate clearly if color should be used for any figures in print
Graphical Abstracts / Highlights files (where applicable)
Supplemental files (where applicable)

Further considerations
• Manuscript has been 'spell checked' and 'grammar checked.'
• All references mentioned in the Reference List are cited in the text, and vice versa
• Permission has been obtained for the use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Internet)
• A competing interests statement is provided, even if the authors have no competing interests to declare
• Journal policies detailed in this guide have been reviewed
• Referee suggestions and contact details provided, based on journal requirements (optional)

C.    Manuscript anatomy

Abstract

The abstract is a brief summary of your research paper, providing an overview of the key sections and findings. It's typically the first thing that readers will read, so it's important to make it clear, concise, and engaging.

Start by providing a brief overview of the topic and its significance, highlighting the research question or hypothesis. Then, summarize the key sections of the paper, including the literature review, methodology, results, and discussion. Finally, provide a brief summary of your main findings and their implications.

It's important to keep the abstract under 250 words and to focus on the most important information. The abstract should be written in a clear and engaging manner, using simple language and avoiding technical jargon.

Introduction

The introduction is the first section of your research paper and serves as an opportunity to introduce your topic, provide background information, and explain the significance of your research. It's important to make a strong first impression in your introduction to grab the reader's attention and make them interested in your study.

Start your introduction by providing a brief overview of the topic you are studying and its relevance. Then, provide some context for the research by discussing previous studies in the field and highlighting any research gaps or questions that your study will address. Clearly state your research question or hypothesis and explain the contribution and novelty of your study. This will help the reader understand the importance of your research and why it's worth studying.

Finally, provide an overview of the structure of your paper, highlighting the key sections. This will give the reader an idea of what to expect in the paper and how the different sections are related. It's important to keep your introduction concise, clear, and engaging to encourage the reader to keep reading.

Literature review

The literature review section of your research paper is where you review and summarize the existing research on the topic you are studying. A well-written literature review should provide a critical analysis of the research in the field, highlighting key debates, themes, and gaps in the literature.

Start by defining your topic and providing a rationale for reviewing the literature. This will help the reader understand why you are reviewing the literature and what you hope to gain from it. Conduct a thorough search of relevant literature sources, and organize and summarize the literature according to key themes or debates. This will help the reader understand the different perspectives and arguments in the field.

Critically analyze the literature, identifying strengths and weaknesses in previous studies, and explain how your study fills a gap in the literature. This will help the reader understand how your study builds on previous research and contributes to the field. Finally, summarize the key findings of the literature review to provide an overview of what has been studied and what remains unknown.

Research Method

The methodology section of your research paper is where you describe the methods used to conduct your research. It's important to provide a clear and concise description of your research design, including the research approach, data collection methods, and analysis procedures.

Start by explaining your research approach, whether it's qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods. Then, describe your data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or observations. Be sure to justify your methods and explain how they will address your research question or hypothesis. Discuss any ethical considerations or limitations of your study. It's important to be as detailed and transparent as possible in your methodology section to allow other researchers to replicate your study. This will also help the reader understand the validity and reliability of your study.

Results and Discussion

The results section of your research paper is where you present your findings. It's important to present your findings in a clear and organized manner, using tables and figures to enhance your results.

Start by providing a brief summary of your results, and organize your findings by research question or hypothesis. Use descriptive and statistical analysis to support your findings, and provide a detailed explanation of what your results mean. This will help the reader understand the implications of your findings and how they relate to your research question or hypothesis. It's important to be objective in your presentation of the results, avoiding any interpretation or discussion of the findings. This will be done in the next section.

The discussion section of your research paper is where you interpret and analyze your findings. It's important to relate your findings back to your research question or hypothesis, and to compare them with previous research in the field. Start by summarizing the main findings of your study and explaining how they address your research question or hypothesis. Then, compare your findings with previous research in the field, discussing similarities, differences, and any unexpected results.

Provide a critical analysis of your findings, discussing their implications and limitations. Address any potential confounding factors or alternative explanations for your findings. This will help the reader understand the strengths and weaknesses of your study and its contribution to the field. Finally, provide recommendations for future research and potential practical applications of your findings. This will help the reader understand the broader significance of your study and how it can be used to inform future research or practice.

Conclusion

The conclusion section of your research paper is where you summarize your key findings and main arguments. It's important to restate your research question or hypothesis and highlight the contribution and novelty of your study. Summarize your main findings and their implications, and discuss the broader significance of your study. Avoid introducing any new information in the conclusion, and keep it focused on summarizing and synthesizing your main points.

References

The references section of your research paper is where you list all sources cited in your paper. Use a consistent citation style, such as APA, and be sure to include all necessary information for each source.